We don’t just install traditional heat sources we are also accredited to install all the latest renewable technologies including Solar PV, Air Sour, Solar Thermal and Biomass.

We are registered with MCS (Microgeneration scheme), which means our installations will be carried out to the highest industry standard, and is required for the FIT (Feed-in Tariff) or RHI (Renewable heat incentive) to be paid for energy generated.

Further details about these technologies can be found below or contact us on 01623 557865.

Our technologies

Solar PV
Uses sunlight to generate clean renewable solar electricity from solar photo-voltaic panels.
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Biomass
Burns logs, wood chip or wood pellet to provide heating.

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Air Source Heat Pump
Uses latent heat from the air to provide heating.

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Solar Thermal
Solar thermal panels use the sun to heat your water.

Learn more…

What is Solar PV?

Solar panel electricity systems, also known as solar photovoltaics (PV), capture the sun’s energy using photovoltaic cells. These cells don’t need direct sunlight to work – they can still generate some electricity on a cloudy day. The cells convert the sunlight into electricity, which can be used to run household appliances and lighting, then exports any excess electricity to the national grid.

The cost of installing domestic solar panels has dropped in recent years and will depend on the type of panels, size and location. The size and location of your solar PV system will also determine the amount of clean green solar electricity you can generate.

The benefits of solar electricity

  • Cut your electricity bills
    Sunlight is free, so once you’ve paid for the initial installation, your electricity costs will be reduced.
  • Get paid for the electricity you generate
    The UK Government’s Feed-in Tariff scheme pays you for the electricity you generate, even if you use it.
  • Sell electricity back to the grid
    If your system is producing more electricity than you need, you can sell the surplus back to the grid through the Feed-in Tariff scheme.
  • Cut your carbon footprint
    Solar electricity is green renewable energy and doesn’t release any harmful carbon dioxide or other pollutants. A typical home solar PV system could save over a tonne of carbon dioxide per year – that’s more than 30 tonnes over its lifetime.

Solar PV

What is Biomass?

Wood-fuelled heating systems, also called biomass systems, burn wood pellets, chips or logs to provide warmth in a single room or to power central heating and hot water boilers.

A stove burns logs or pellets to heat a single room – and may be fitted with a back boiler to provide water heating as well. A boiler burns logs, pellets or chips, and is connected to a central heating and hot water system. A wood-fuelled biomass boiler could save you up to £880 a year compared to electric heating.

The benefits of biomass heating

  • Affordable heating fuel
    Although the price of wood fuel varies considerably, it is often cheaper than other heating options most notably Oil and LPG.
  • Financial support
    Wood fuel boiler systems could benefit from the Renewable Heat Incentive.
  • A low-carbon option
    The carbon dioxide emitted when wood is burned is the same amount that was absorbed over the months and years that the plant was growing. The process is sustainable as long as new plants continue to grow in place of those used for fuel. There are some carbon emissions caused by the cultivation, manufacture and transportation of the fuel, but as long as the fuel is sourced locally, these are much lower than the emissions from fossil fuels.

Biomass

What is Air Source Heating?

Air source heat pumps absorb heat from the outside air. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, underfloor heating systems, or warm air convectors and hot water in your home.

An air source heat pump extracts heat from the outside air in the same way that a fridge extracts heat from its inside. It can get heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15° C. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run, but the heat they extract from the ground, air, or water is constantly being renewed naturally.

The benefits of air source heat pumps

  • Lower fuel bills, especially if you are replacing conventional electric heating
  • Potential income through the UK Government’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)
  • Lower home carbon emissions, depending on which fuel you are replacing
  • No fuel deliveries needed
  • Can heat your home as well as your water
  • Minimal maintenance required
  • Can be easier to install than a ground source heat pump

Unlike gas and oil boilers, heat pumps deliver heat at lower temperatures over much longer periods. During the winter they may need to be on constantly to heat your home efficiently. You will also notice that radiators won’t feel as hot to the touch as they might do when you are using a gas or oil boiler.

Is an air source heat pump suitable for me?

To tell if an air source heat pump is right for you, there are a few key questions to consider:

  • Do you have somewhere to put it? You’ll need a place outside your home where a unit can be fitted to a wall or placed on the ground. It will need plenty of space around it to get a good flow of air. A sunny wall is ideal.
  • Is your home well insulated? Since air source heat pumps work best when producing heat at a lower temperature than traditional boilers, it’s essential that your home is insulated and draught-proofed well for the heating system to be effective.
  • What fuel will you be replacing? The system will pay for itself much more quickly if it’s replacing an electricity or coal heating system. Heat pumps may not be the best option for homes using mains gas.
  • What type of heating system will you use? Air source heat pumps can perform better with underfloor heating systems or warm air heating than with radiator-based systems because of the lower water temperatures required.
  • Is the system intended for a new development? Combining the installation with other building work can reduce the cost of installing the system.

What is Solar Thermal?

Solar water heating systems use free heat from the sun to warm domestic hot water. A conventional boiler or immersion heater can be used to make the water hotter, or to provide hot water when solar energy is unavailable.

The benefits of solar water heating

  • Hot water throughout the year. The system works all year round, though you’ll need to heat the water further with a boiler or immersion heater during the winter months.
  • Reduced energy bills. Sunlight is free, so once you’ve paid for the initial installation your hot water costs will be reduced.
  • Lower carbon footprint. Solar hot water is a green, renewable heating system and can reduce your carbon dioxide emissions.

How do solar water heating systems work?

Solar water heating systems use solar panels, called collectors, fitted to your roof. These collect heat from the sun and use it to heat up water which is stored in a hot water cylinder. A boiler or immersion heater can be used as a back-up to heat the water further to reach the temperature you want.

There are two types of solar water heating panels:

  1. Evacuated tubes
  2. Flat plate collectors, which can be fixed on the roof tiles or integrated into the roof

Larger solar panels can also be arranged to provide some contribution to heating your home as well. However, the amount of heat provided is generally very small and it is not normally considered worthwhile.

Things to consider

  • Do you have a sunny place to put solar panels? You’ll need around five square metres of roof space facing East to West in a Southerly direction, which receives direct sunlight for the main part of the day. The panels don’t have to be mounted on a roof however. They can be fixed to a frame on a flat roof or hang from a wall.
  • Do you have space for a larger, or an extra, hot water cylinder? If a dedicated solar cylinder is not already installed then you will usually need to replace the existing cylinder, or add a dedicated cylinder with a solar heating coil.
  • Is your current boiler compatible with solar water heating? Most conventional boiler and hot water cylinder systems are compatible with solar water heating. If your boiler is a combination boiler (combi) and you don’t currently have a hot water tank, a solar hot water system may not be compatible.

Solar Thermal

For more information on renewable technologies and their benefits visit www.energysavingtrust.org.uk